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St. Simons Island Winter Activities

St. Simons Island Winter Activities for FamiliesSt. Simons Island Winter Activities for Families

  1. Bike Riding

With miles of winding bike paths, you can cover most of the island without setting foot in the road. You will enjoy a ride along the marsh as well next to huge oaks covered in Spanish moss. Bike trails run all the way to Mallory Pier and past the airport making it fun and easy to have a nice lunch out before heading back to your oceanfront condo.

  1. Historical Attractions

In the summer, you might opt for a day at the water park, pool, or beach over checking out all the wonderful history St. Simons has to offer. The winter however is the perfect chance to get out and explore the rich history the island offers. Visit Fort Frederica and learn about and how it guarded the coast from the Spanish occupied St. Augustine. Or maybe see what life was like at an authentic rice plantation at Hofwyl-Broadfield Plantation.

  1. Jekyll Island Treasure Hunt

Each year Jekyll Island selects artist from across the country to make one-of-a-kind glass floats, similar to what fisherman used in the early 1900’s to mark their nets. These floats are hidden across Jekyll Island for lucky folks to find.

  1. Bring Your Pets to the Beach

Although our beaches are pet friendly year-round, during the winter months pets enjoy unrestricted access on the beach. Take them for a fun walk at any time of day! We know our furry friends are family members too, so be sure to check out our pet friendly rentals so they can enjoy a winter getaway with you!

 

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The Island Treasure Hunt Begins on Jekyll Island

IslandTreasure

In January of each year, St. Simons Island’s neighbor, Jekyll Island, starts a two-month-long treasure hunt called “Island Treasures.” The tradition began in 2002 and residents and visitors alike enjoy the search.

The treasures being sought are handcrafted glass floats. Jekyll Island commissions talented glass artisans from all over the country to hand craft the pieces. Each glass float is unique and has the year imprinted on the bottom.

The symbolic glass floats of today do have historical significance in Coastal Georgia and other beachfront communities. In the early 1900s, fisherman used glass floats on their nets. The floats would break loose and wash ashore and beachcombers loved finding the glass floats. With the use of plastic and Styrofoam floats today, the glass treasures are an echo of the past.

If you find an Island Treasure, you can register it at the Jekyll Island Guest Information Center to receive a certificate of authenticity along with a biography of the artist. The Center is open 9am-6pm Monday through Saturday and 10am-5pm on Sundays. The treasure hunt continues now through February, 2014.